RBRquartz³ Q bottom pressure recorders resolve small-scale changes in water level across a coral reef to determine roughness over complex terrain

In March 2017, a team from Stanford University deployed five RBRquartz³ Q bottom pressure recorders on the coral reef off the coast of Ofu, a South Pacific island of American Samoa, to resolve centimeter-scale changes in water surface height over the reef. The measurements they collected support the development of a comprehensive understanding of drag over complex terrain. Quantifying drag … Read More

New RBRquartz³ BPR|zero with AzeroA capabilities enables climate, ocean circulation, and geophysical studies

Deepwater pressure measurements with the highest level of stability are critical for climate, global ocean circulation, and geophysical process studies. The RBRquartz³ BPR|zero is a special version of the RBRquartz³ BPR (bottom pressure recorder) implementing an internal barometer and switching valve. The novel AzeroA technique is used to provide in-situ reference measurements to correct for long term drift in the … Read More

RBR expands into Australia

We are incredibly pleased to announce that Stefan Stimson has joined the RBR team as Australia’s Business Development Manager. Stef brings decades of experience in the survey and oceanographic world, where he has worked alongside RBR on many projects over the past 14 years. Stef is based in Australia, where he will lead sales and business development efforts for customers … Read More

RBR Supports Early-Career Ocean Scientists in the RBR2020 Cohort Program

In January, RBR announced the 16 members of the RBR2020 Cohort, a two-year accelerator program for innovative early-career ocean scientists. Members of the cohort will be supported by RBR and leading ocean scientist mentors to develop their proposed projects, enable new measurements and methods, and communicate their results. Launched in September, 2019, the RBR2020 Cohort challenged applicants to propose innovative … Read More

WHOI’s ChemYak equipped with RBRconcerto CTD captures outgassing pulse during ice break-up in Cambridge Bay, Canada

In spring 2018, researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) surveyed the Arctic nearshore of Cambridge Bay, Canada, by remote-controlled kayak equipped with an RBRconcerto CTD. The CTD and chemical data they collected captured the outgassing pulse associated with ice break-up and helped them identify the physical dynamics that created the pulse, allowing them to better constrain the annual greenhouse … Read More