RBRsolo³ D | Depth Loggers deployed in research on wave transmission through mangrove forests

In July of 2019, Tori Tomiczek and Anna Wargula, assistant professors at the United States Naval Academy’s Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering in Annapolis, Maryland, USA, mounted RBRsolo³ D depth loggers to the roots of mangroves in Key West, Florida, to determine the transmission of boat wakes through the saltwater-inundated trees. Their work will help to better quantify … Read More

RBRlegato C.T.D & RTSYS NemoSens

RTSYS has integrated the RBRlegato3 C.T.D on the NemoSens© micro-AUV for low-power measurements of temperature, pressure, salinity, and sound velocity. The NemoSens is a 90cm long micro-AUV and an evolution of the RTSYS range of larger AUVs. It is lightweight, easy-to-use, modular, and intended for water quality, hydrographic, and acoustic surveys, building on RTSYS’s years of acoustics experience. NemoSens uses … Read More

RBR instruments study sea level rise in the Canadian Arctic

Since the writing of this story, published in ECO Magazine, the Milne Ice Shelf has collapsed into the Arctic Ocean. A team of Canadian and American researchers are using RBR temperature and salinity loggers to study how the Arctic’s ice shelves are changing over time. By understanding their disappearance, the researchers are able to predict the dynamics of the much … Read More

The Nature Trust of British Columbia and Coastal First Nations deploy RBR loggers to enhance sustainability of wild BC fish stocks

In fall of 2019, The Nature Trust of British Columbia (The Nature Trust of BC), Canada, launched a five-year monitoring program using RBRsolo³ Tu turbidity loggers and RBRmaestro³ multi-channel water quality loggers to determine the resilience of 15 estuaries to sea-level rise and climate change. The Enhancing Estuary Resilience Project is a partnership between The Nature Trust of BC, the … Read More

RBRquartz³ Q bottom pressure recorders resolve small-scale changes in water level across a coral reef to determine roughness over complex terrain

In March 2017, a team from Stanford University deployed five RBRquartz³ Q bottom pressure recorders on the coral reef off the coast of Ofu, a South Pacific island of American Samoa, to resolve centimeter-scale changes in water surface height over the reef. The measurements they collected support the development of a comprehensive understanding of drag over complex terrain. Quantifying drag … Read More