Investigating seafloor crustal deformation with RBR loggers

Professor Ryota Hino of Tohoku University uses RBRsolo T|deep|slow and RBRduet T.D|deep loggers attached to a submarine acoustic ranging device to investigate seafloor crustal deformation. The submarine acoustic rangefinder accurately measures the distance between two points by sending a call signal from another device installed on the seabed at a remote location and measuring the time until the response signal … Read More

RBRargo CTDs profile under Hurricane Florence and provide critical forecasting data

On September 11, 2018, a NOAA Hurricane Hunter airplane flew into the path of Hurricane Florence and air-deployed 10 RBRargo CTDs mounted to profiling floats that parachuted into the Atlantic Ocean. The upper-ocean temperature data collected by the profiling floats was used to improve the forecast of the hurricane’s intensity as it headed for the Carolinas. Florence grew into a … Read More

RBR array collects fine-scale measurements in the strongly stratified centimeters-thick boundary layer under seasonal lake ice

Researchers from Germany, Russia and Finland deployed 12 RBRsolo³ T temperature loggers into an ice-covered lake in northern Finland to study heat transfer at the ice-water interface. The fine-scale measurements they collected are helping them to identify the role of turbulence in the boundary layer. The 2018 study, “Turbulent mixing and heat fluxes under lake ice: the role of seiche … Read More

Uncovering the Ocean Dynamics Off the Coast of Madeira Island, Portugal

In the lee of Madeira Island, a famous-to-oceanographers formation occurs. To better understand ‘Madeira-Mode Water’, a team of researchers from the Oceanic Observatory of Madeira (OOM) set out in July, 2018, with an RBRconcerto³ CTD mounted to a Del Mar Oceanographic (DMO) Wirewalker and observed the daily thermocline cycle at a new level of detail. From the Portuguese naval ship … Read More

Wave data and modeling inform harbour planning in southern Nova Scotia

The small fishing harbour of Lower Sandy Point, near the southern tip of Nova Scotia, was modified to reduce the agitating effects of swell. Breakwaters were added, nearly enclosing the harbour. The resulting structure – approximately in the shape of two backward Ls with an opening between their bases – successfully reduced the swell, and, several times each year, in … Read More